Browsing articles in "Salmon River Regulations"

Strategic Vision of the Great Lakes Fishery Commission 2011–2020

Jul 31, 2014   //   by Geoff Schaake   //   Cack Handed, Environmental Stuff, Salmon River Regulations  //  Comments Off on Strategic Vision of the Great Lakes Fishery Commission 2011–2020

An interesting history and vision for the Great Lakes.  Lots of good info for Atlantic Salmon in here

Worth the read.

StrategicVision2012

56% of the Chinook salmon harvested in New York waters of Lake Ontario were wild

Jun 11, 2013   //   by Geoff Schaake   //   Cack Handed, Environmental Stuff, Salmon River Regulations  //  Comments Off on 56% of the Chinook salmon harvested in New York waters of Lake Ontario were wild

In speaking with Fran verdoliva about getting permits for Spey Nation, we had a very interesting discussion about wild fish in the Salmon. Specifically the results of the fin clipping survey for Kings. It opened my eyes and prompted me to want to learn more. Check out the results of all the fish surveys for Lake Ontario this year.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/fish_marine_pdf/lou2012hilights.pdf

Chinook Salmon Marking Projects

In 2008, NYSDEC purchased an automated fish marking trailer (AutoFish) which is capable of adipose clipping and/or applying coded wire tags (CWTs) to salmon and trout at high speed and accuracy. To determine the proportions of wild and hatchery Chinook salmon in Lake Ontario, all Chinook salmon stocked by New York and Ontario from 2008-2011 were marked with an adipose fin clip. In 2012, preliminary results indicated that 56% of the Chinook salmon harvested in New York waters of Lake Ontario were wild. The proportion of wild Chinook salmon observed in most New York tributaries varied by fish age but was generally low (i.e., 5-20%), except in the Salmon River, where approximately 70% of angler-caught Chinook salmon were wild.

To determine the degree of homing and straying to the NYSDEC Salmon River Hatchery (SRH), all Chinook Salmon stocked at the Salmon River received adipose fin clips and CWTs from 2008-2010. Straying of fish from other sites to the SRH from 2009-2012 has varied with year class and age, but has been generally low with straying rates of 6-12%.

Great news for an emerging fishery

Jul 8, 2011   //   by Geoff Schaake   //   Cack Handed, Mojo, Salmon River Regulations  //  Comments Off on Great news for an emerging fishery

Considerations for Freshwater Sportfish Regulation Changes For 2012-2014

The Department is currently considering the following items for the next round of freshwater regulation changes. ; Proposals will actually be finalized and made available for public comment during the late summer and early fall of 2011, and would become effective on October 1, 2012.

Description: Define use of flylines and supplemental weight for the Salmon River special regulations fly areas. This essentially removes the use of supplemental weight, weighted flies and sinking flylines during the summer and assigns a weight limit for supplemental weight and sinking fly to eliminate the “weight of the line must propel the cast” regulation. A “no weight” restriction (i.e., only floating line and unweighted leaders and flies allowed) will be implemented from May 1 – 15 for the Lower Fly Area and from May 1 – August 31 for the Upper Fly Area.

Rationale: To reduce the foul hooking of fish. Input from summer fly fishing anglers indicates that these fish will actively chase artificial flies in the flows that occur during the summer and aggressively take wet flies fished just under the surface or in the surface film, as well as dry flies fished on the water’s surface. Atlantic salmon and summer steelhead are the most aggressive takers of flies in the Salmon River. These fish should not be disturbed when they choose to be inactive due to elevated temperatures. Adding weights significantly increases the probability of anglers intentionally or unintentionally foul hooking all salmonids in summer flows. There is currently some level of abuse occurring.

 

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